CALL 978-216-3268 Open Gym and Fitness Hours

Open Gym and Fitness Hours

FieldHouse Sudbury Blog

RSS Grab FieldHouse Sudbury RSS Feed

Keep Your Weight Loss Program On-Track

Joseph Coupal - Tuesday, March 06, 2018

FieldHouse, Sudbury, MAOften we try to get in shape in the summer, and then we tend to get lax about our diet and exercise as fall and the cooler weather move in, then we want to get in shape for summer again. This is a frustrating roller-coaster. If your weight loss program was working and has now tapered off, this is normal. No matter how faithful you are, from time to time you'll fall off the wagon.

Here are some strategies for you to try.

1. Visualize

Have a vision of success. The mind is a strong tool -- use it to achieve what you want.

While you're imagining, remind yourself of reality: excess weight and yo-yo dieting is unhealthy. Make sure this is a lifetime commitment not a temporary plan to drop 10 pounds.

To stay with your weight loss program, only keep healthy foods in the house.

2. Understand Your Weight Loss Personality

Personality plays a role in our attitude towards food. You should know your tendencies and tailor your weight loss plan to conquer your unproductive inclinations.

3. Write Down Everything You Eat or Drink

A common mistake is underestimating how much food you've eaten. This can lead to a weight loss plateau or weight gain. Keep a diary of your daily food intake (every bite, taste, or lick) can help you see where you're going wrong.

4. Beware of 'Calorie Creep'

A key reason for a gaining weight is eating more than you think. It's easy for portion sizes to increase. It is important to weigh and measure your food to understand proper portions. Try cutting your daily calorie intake by 100 or 200 to move beyond the weight loss plateau.

5. Watch Restaurant Overeating

At restaurants, rich foods and supersized portions can sway even the most determined dieter. Especially if you eat out often, look at restaurant eating as a chance to practice good portion control.

6. Eat Protein to Manage Hunger

A high protein diet can help squelch hunger. Protein foods work by suppressing a hormone secreted by the stomach that stimulates appetite. Foods high in fat actually raised levels of that hormone and increased hunger. Carbohydrates make people hungrier than they were before they had eaten.

7. Eat More Fruits and Vegetables

Fill up on produce. Eating lots of low-calorie, high-volume fruits and vegetables crowds out other foods that are higher in fat and calories. The U.S. government's dietary guidelines suggest that we get 7-13 cups of produce daily.

8. Push your Exercise Routine

Using the treadmill every day for 30-minutes or walking the neighborhood with friends is good, but your body gets used to it too. After a while, your muscles get used to the routine and become very efficient at doing the task at hand.

To keep your muscles guessing and burning calories, vary your physical activity and exercise routine.

Also make sure your routine includes strength-training exercises which help counteract muscle loss due to aging. Building and preserving muscle mass is a key factor in reaching a healthy weight, as muscle requires more calories to maintain than fat.

10. Try Yoga to Avoid Stress Eating

Stress eating is bingeing on food to soothe your inner emotional turmoil. You are not really hungry. Yoga lowers levels of stress hormones.

For more information on maintaining a healthy lifestyle, contact The FieldHouse in Sudbury.

WebMD

12 Tips for Holiday Eating and Weight Maintenance

Joseph Coupal - Monday, December 11, 2017

FieldHouse, Sudbury, MAIt’s easy to get swept up in the holiday season. The feasts and parties that make up this time of year can tax the arteries and strain the waistline. By eating just 200 extra calories a day — a piece of pecan pie and a tumbler of eggnog here, a couple latkes and some butter cookies there — you could pack on two to three pounds over this five- to six-week period. That doesn’t sound like much, except few people shed extra weight in the following months and years.

You don’t need to deprive yourself, eat only boring foods, or take your treats with a side order of guilt. Instead, by practicing a bit of defensive eating and cooking, you can come through the holidays without making “go on a diet” one of your New Year’s resolutions.

1. Budget wisely. Don’t eat everything at feasts and parties. Be choosy, and spend calories judiciously on the foods you love.

2. Take 10 before taking seconds. It takes a few minutes for your stomach’s “I’m getting full” signal to get to your brain. After finishing your first helping, take a 10-minute break. Make conversation. Drink some water. Then recheck your appetite. You might realize you are full, or want only a small portion of seconds.

3. Distance helps the heart stay healthy. At a party, don’t stand next to the food table. That makes it harder to mindlessly reach for food as you talk. If you know you are prone to recreational eating, pop a mint or a stick of gum so you won’t keep reaching for the chips.

4. Don’t go out with an empty tank. Before setting out for a party, eat something so you don’t arrive famished. Excellent pre-party snacks combine complex carbohydrates with protein and unsaturated fat, like apple slices with peanut butter or a slice of turkey and cheese on whole-wheat pita bread.

5. Drink to your health. A glass of eggnog can set you back 500 calories; wine, beer, and mixed drinks range from 150 to 225 calories. If you drink alcohol, have a glass of water or juice-flavored seltzer in between drinks.

6. Avoid alcohol on an empty stomach. Alcohol increases your appetite and diminishes your ability to control what you eat.

7. Put on your dancing (or walking) shoes. Dancing is a great way to work off some holiday calories. If you are at a family gathering, suggest a walk before the feast or even between dinner and dessert.

8. Make room for veggies. At meals and parties, don’t ignore fruits and vegetables. They make great snacks and even better side or main dishes — unless they’re slathered with creamy sauces or butter.

9. Be buffet savvy. At a buffet, wander ’round the food table before putting anything on your plate. By checking out all of your options, you might be less inclined to pile on items one after another.

10. Don’t shop hungry. Eat before you go shopping so the scent of Cinnabons or caramel corn doesn’t tempt you to gobble treats you don’t need.

11. Cook from (and for) the heart. To show family and friends that you really care about them, be creative with recipes that use less butter, cream, lard, vegetable shortening, and other ingredients rich in saturated fats and cholesterol. Prepare turkey or fish instead of red meat.

12. Pay attention to what really matters. Although food is an integral part of the holidays, put the focus on family and friends, laughter and cheer. If balance and moderation are your usual guides, it’s okay to indulge or overeat once in a while.

For more information healthy eating and exercise during the holidays, contact FieldHouse in Sudbury, MA.

Harvard Health


Follow Us

Delivered by FeedBurner

Tags